I think therefore I can

I think therefore I canIt’s gonna be a great year!!! How do I know this? Cos I said so! I think therefore I can! What does this have to do with natural health? Everything! (She smiles knowingly.)

Your health is a blend of physicality and mentality. In other words, how you feel physically can be influenced by how you feel emotionally. Your feelings and your thoughts can have a direct impact on your overall wellness and this means that you can positively influence your physical well being. You can think yourself to wellness.

Now let’s be realistic here. If you have liver failure, or a broken leg or appendicitis, just thinking about being well isn’t going to actually make you well. You will need a liver transplant or that broken leg set and plastered or that infected appendix surgically removed but (there’s always a “but” isn’t there!) you can help speed up your recovery by being positive about how well you are once orthodox medicine has stepped in to save the acute situation you’re in.

I think therefore I canAside from acute situations though and speaking more generally, you can influence how you feel physically by deliberately choosing how you speak to yourself. By saying things like “I am amazingly well”, you can gradually impact on cellular activity within your body and you can begin to feel more positive about your general health and well being. If you think positively, you become more positive and healthy. As my saying goes, “I think therefore I can”. Positive thinking can have amazing outcomes on physical health and this has been researched a number of times (I’ve pasted some links to research for you below).

So, while I recognise that we’ll always need herbal therapies to combat infections, diseases and illness and orthodox medicine is so powerful at relieving trauma and serious conditions, positive thinking does have a clear and important place in influencing health and wellbeing outcomes. I encourage you to listen to the words you tell yourself about yourself each day. If you’re telling yourself how painful your condition is (and of course it is!) or how ill you feel, then maybe trying to swap those words for something more positive and uplifting might speed your recovery or reduce some of that pain.

I think therefore I canAs well as a naturopath, I’m also an ambulance officer and we’re taught that prior to giving pain relief, we “talk it up” a bit. We tell our patients how well the drug is going to work and how much their pain is going to be reduced. So often I see amazing pain relief results that can’t be attributed simply to the drug I’ve administered. The placebo effect is so powerful because the brain acts on what it believes to be so. This same principle applies to thinking positively about your general health. If you can say positive words about your health, to yourself, often enough, eventually your brain picks up on that, believes it and stimulates physical functions and systems to reduce pain, to increase general wellness and to improve fitness.

So I’ve decided that 2013 is going to be sensational. I’m going to be healthy, vibrant, successful, peaceful and an around “good guy”. Want to join me?

If you’d like to know about how herbs can improve your health, please download my free eBook “Feel Healthy with Natural Therapies” and find out how you can regain your health and vitality. Put a link in here

Smiles and abundant health, Ziggy

References

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/20182190?uid=3737536&uid=2&uid=4&sid=21101698716477 .

http://epsy.tamu.edu/uploads/files/Elliott/cpsy685/Taylor%20and%20positive%20illusions.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1201429/

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment. Keep up to date with new posts by subscribing to the RSS feed or subscribe to the comments.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>